Download A Natural History of Rape: Biological Bases of Sexual by Randy Thornhill, Craig T. Palmer PDF

By Randy Thornhill, Craig T. Palmer

During this sure-to-be-controversial e-book, Randy Thornhill and Craig Palmer use evolutionary biology to give an explanation for the reasons of rape and to suggest new methods to its prevention. in keeping with Thornhill and Palmer, advanced edition of a few kind supplies upward thrust to rape; the most evolutionary query is whether or not rape is an variation itself or a derivative of alternative diversifications. whatever the solution, Thornhill and Palmer be aware, rape circumvents a critical function of women's reproductive method: mate selection. this can be a fundamental the reason is, rape is devastating to its sufferers, specifically younger ladies. Thornhill and Palmer handle, and declare to demolish scientifically, many myths approximately rape bred by means of social technology concept during the last twenty-five years. the preferred competition that rapists should not prompted by means of sexual hope is, they argue, scientifically misguided. even supposing they argue that rape is organic, Thornhill and Palmer don't view it as inevitable. Their concepts for rape prevention contain educating younger men to not rape, punishing rape extra critically, and learning the effectiveness of "chemical castration." additionally they suggest that younger women examine the organic motives of rape while making judgements approximately gown, visual appeal, and social actions. Rape may possibly stop to exist, they argue, purely in a society familiar with its evolutionary explanations. The e-book encompasses a necessary precis of evolutionary thought and a comparability of evolutionary biology's and social science's factors of human habit. The authors argue for the better explanatory strength and functional usefulness of evolutionary biology. The e-book is certain to fire up dialogue either at the particular subject of rape and at the greater problems with how we comprehend and impact human habit.

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Additional resources for A Natural History of Rape: Biological Bases of Sexual Coercion

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I do this, not because I believe in a special, non-evolutionary creation for humans. " Although culture certainly hasn't simplified the task of understanding human behavior and development, has it really removed some human behaviors from the realm of biology and evolutionary explanation? Are some human behaviors biological and others not? The feminist biologist Victoria Sork (1997, p. " The confusion here is the same one we pointed out in our discussion of heritability. Yes, some differences in behavior between individuals could be due entirely to cultural influences that have affected Rape and Evolutionary Theory 25 their behavior.

Assume that each wants to win the argument. Suppose A is being interviewed by B for a job in a traditional social science department. Suppose that during the interview B argues that, because human behavior is cultural, it is independent of biology (and, therefore, A should not be hired). Knowing that many people erroneously equate biol- 30 Chapter 1 ogy with genetics, A launches into a long speech about gene-environment interactions, ontogeny, and psychological adaptations and looks for signs of comprehension from B—nods, affirmative grunts, perhaps even a smile.

Males usually fight among themselves for females or for resources important to females. Males take the initiative in courtship. Males engage in risky activities in order to locate and to impress females. In general, whereas males often behave as if any female of their species (and sometimes females of other species, and sometimes inanimate objects) is a suitable mate and strive to encounter many mates, females act as if only certain males in the population are appropriate mates. Trivers's theory of sex differences obtains its strongest support from the existence of a few species, including some fishes, frogs, birds, and insects, that show "sex-role reversal," females being more sexually competitive than males and males choosier about mates than females.

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